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Quality Evaluation of Fresh Selected Orange Fleshed Sweet Potatoes in Lake zone of Tanzania

Vitamin A Deficiency (VAD) is a public health problem in developing countries in children below five years. Orange Fleshed Sweet Potatoes (OFSP) are rich in β-carotene a pre-cassor for vitamin A. Being a cheap and affordable source, can be utilized by incorporating in staple foods to combat VAD in developing countries. OFSP fresh roots (Ejumla, Jewel and Carrot dar) were collected from Ukerewe and Misungwi District, Mwanza region for quality evaluation. The findings of the study indicated that there was considerable variance in the nutrient content across the several types of OFSP that were tested. Among the varieties that were chosen for analysis, it was found that Jewel had the maximum quantity of β-carotene (113,565 ± 1.45 µg/100 g), whilst Carrot dar had the lowest concentration (5,165 ± 3.38 µg/100 g). In addition to β-carotene, the aforementioned varieties of OFSP exhibited a diverse array of nutrients, including protein (3.82% - 8.86%), fat (0.32% - 0.51%), fibre (1.83% - 3.15%), carbohydrate (87.05% - 92.60%), ash (0.86% - 1.09%), ascorbic acid (15.04 mg/100 g - 17.27 mg/100 g), and energy content (385.19 Kcal/100 g - 392.92 Kcal/100 g). Several minerals were discovered in the selected OFSP varieties. Jewel exhibits a high content of essential minerals such as calcium (44.30 mg/100g), iron (1.34 mg/100g), zinc (0.35 mg/100g), and potassium (317.12 mg/100g). Conversely, Ejumla is characterized by its notable sodium (112 mg/100g) and magnesium (2.73 mg/100g) content, making it a valuable source of these minerals. Based on the findings, it can be concluded that OFSP possesses a high concentration of essential nutrients that play a crucial role in addressing both macro and micro-nutrient deficiencies in developing countries. Hence, individuals should integrate Orange Fleshed Sweet Potatoes into their primary food sources as a means of enhancing the overall nutritional value.

β-Carotene, Micro Nutrient Deficiency, Minerals, Orange-Fleshed Sweet Potato, Ascorbic Acid

APA Style

Chuwa, C., Issa-Zacharia, A. (2023). Quality Evaluation of Fresh Selected Orange Fleshed Sweet Potatoes in Lake zone of Tanzania. Journal of Food and Nutrition Sciences, 11(6), 174-181. https://doi.org/10.11648/j.jfns.20231106.13

ACS Style

Chuwa, C.; Issa-Zacharia, A. Quality Evaluation of Fresh Selected Orange Fleshed Sweet Potatoes in Lake zone of Tanzania. J. Food Nutr. Sci. 2023, 11(6), 174-181. doi: 10.11648/j.jfns.20231106.13

AMA Style

Chuwa C, Issa-Zacharia A. Quality Evaluation of Fresh Selected Orange Fleshed Sweet Potatoes in Lake zone of Tanzania. J Food Nutr Sci. 2023;11(6):174-181. doi: 10.11648/j.jfns.20231106.13

Copyright © 2023 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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